The recession-proof Christmas Eve dinner

Christmas Eve is a big deal to me. We celebrate the birth of our Lord, Jesus Christ, and we pig out at the same time.

beeftenderloin

I’m usually partial to a beef tenderloin, but checking the price of a whole tenderloin in the store today (you save a bit of money butchering your own), it’s through the roof – $70! I’m a tight-wad so that won’t fly this year. By the way, for a terrific guide to cutting a whole beef tenderloin into steaks, check out the December issue of Saveur.

So I’m actually thinking of going the other way. I’m thinking about something that is delicious, irresistable, and cheap. I’m thinking about corned beef hash and not homemade. There is no better corned beef hash than the stuff right out of the can that looks like dog food. I am serious as a heart attack. Here’s what you do. In a large skillet, saute one small chopped onion in butter until it begins to get crispy brown. Add a can of corned beef hash.

corned-beef-hash1

Now, this is the part that takes awhile. You have to let it cook, somewhat undisturbed until the hash stars to turn brown. Add plenty of pepper at this point. Continue to cook until the hash is crispy brown through and through. Do not get discouraged. There’s a lot of fat in a can of corned beef hash and it takes awhile for all that fat to reduce into browned goodness.  Traditionally, we serve corned beef hash with English muffins and blackberry jam.

Beef tenderloin: $70. Corned beef hash: Less than $1. These are perilous times, folks, but there are good eats still to be had for cheap.

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